Difference between revisions of "User talk:Marina"

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==Welcome!==
 
==Welcome!==
   
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Hello, Marina!<br>
 
Welcome at TORI.<br>
 
I see, you already have successfully uploaded one file.<br>
 
Keep doing!<br>
 
You may ask your questions
 
here,<br>
 
at [[File talk:Lovelace-1.jpg]] <br>
 
at [[Talk:Richard Lovelace]] <br>
 
at [[User talk:T]]<br>
 
or at the "discussion" of any other page best related to your question.<br>
 
 
Add four "tilde"s at the end; they become your signature. [[User:T|T]] ([[User talk:T|talk]]) 14:08, 21 December 2020 (JST)
 
Add four "tilde"s at the end; they become your signature. [[User:T|T]] ([[User talk:T|talk]]) 14:08, 21 December 2020 (JST)
 
[[User:T|T]] ([[User talk:T|talk]]) 14:08, 21 December 2020 (JST)
 
[[User:T|T]] ([[User talk:T|talk]]) 14:08, 21 December 2020 (JST)
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== I am using this space for temporary files - modifications for wiki ==
 
== I am using this space for temporary files - modifications for wiki ==
   
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In 1968 (10 November), Lovelace and his collaborators discovered period <math>P\approx 33</math> ms of the [[Crab Pulsar]].<ref name=”Lovelace1968”>[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968IAUC.2113....1L/abstract “Pulsar NP 0532 Near Crab Nebula”] R. V. E. Lovelace, J. M. Sutton, and H. D. Craft 1968, November, IAU Circ., No. 2113, #1 (1968) </ref><ref name="Lovell1973">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1973ozjb.book.....L/abstract "Out of the Zenith. Jodrell Bank 1957-1970"] Sir. Bernard Lovell, 1973, London: Oxford University Press, pp 1-255 (see page159).</ref> As a graduate student working at [[Arecibo Observatory]], Lovelace developed a version of the [[Fast Fourier transform]] program <ref name="Lovelace1969">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1969Natur.222..231L/abstract "Digital Search Methods for Pulsars"] 1969, R. V. E. Lovelace, J. M. Sutton, E. E. Salpeter, ''Nature'' 222 (5190), 231-233.</ref>
 
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== 21 February ==
<ref name="Heideman1984">[https://www.cis.rit.edu/class/simg716/Gauss_History_FFT.pdf "Gauss and the history of the fast Fourier transform"] Heideman, Michael T., Johnson, Don H., Burrus, Charles Sidney (1984). (PDF). IEEE ASSP Magazine. 1 (4): 14–21. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.309.181. doi:10.1109/MASSP.1984.1162257. S2CID 10032502.</ref> which
 
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was adapted to run on the Arecibo Observatory's [[CDC 3000 series|CDC 3200]] computer
 
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<ref name=”LovelaceTaylor2012”>[http://articles.adsabs.harvard.edu/pdf/2012Obs...132..186L "On the Discovery of the Period of the Crab Nebula Pulsar"] R.V.E. Lovelace & G. Leonard Tyler, 2012, The Observatory, V. 132, p. 186-188</ref>. This program helped to separate the periodic pulsar signal from the noise, and one night he discovered the period of the [[Crab pulsar]], which is approximately 33 ms.
 
<ref name = "Comella1969">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1969Natur.221..453C/abstract "Crab nebula pulsar NP 0532"] 1969, J. M. Comella, H. D. Craft, R. V. E. Lovelace, J. M. Sutton, G. L. Tyler, ''Nature'' 221 (5179), 453-454.</ref><ref name=”Lang2013”>[https://books.google.com/books?id=Nq_1CAAAQBAJ&newbks=1&newbks_redir=0&printsec=frontcover&pg=PA1&hl=en#v=onepage&q&f=false "Astrophysical Formulae. Space, Time, Matter and Cosmology"] Kenneth R. Lang 2014, Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg</ref> A few weeks earlier, observers from the [[National Radio Astronomy Observatory]] reported that two pulsating sources
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He invented a trapping mechanism of spin-polarized neutral gas, which has been experimentally demonstrated.<ref name="LovelaceEtAl1985">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1985Natur.318...30L/abstract "Magnetic confinement of a neutral gas"] R. V. E. Lovelace, C. Mehanian, T. J. Tommila, D. M. Lee 1985, ''Nature'' 318 (6041), 30-36.</ref><ref name="Ketterle2002">[https://journals.aps.org/rmp/pdf/10.1103/RevModPhys.74.1131 “Nobel lecture: When atoms behave as waves: Bose-Einstein condensation and the atom laser”] W. Ketterle 2002, Reviews of Modern Physics, 74, 1131-1151 (see page 1134)</ref>
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were found near the Crab Nebula and could be coincident with it, and that both sources were sporadic, with no evident periodicities.<ref name="Howard1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968IAUC.2110....2H/abstract "Pulsating radio sources near Crab Nebula"] Howard, W. E., Staelin, D. H., Reifenstein, E. C. 1968, IAU Circ., No. 2110, #2 (1968)</ref><ref name="Staelin1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968Sci...162.1481S/abstract "Pulsating Radio Sources near the Crab Nebula"] Staelin, David H. and Reifenstein, Edward C., III, December 1968, Science, Volume 162, Issue 3861, pp. 1481-1483</ref>. On November 9 of 1968, Lovelace finished his computing program, and on the night from 9 to 10 of November he discovered that one of pulsars have a period of approximately 33 ms, which was the shortest period pulsar at that time.<ref name="Bondi1968"/>. Lovelace and collaborators found that only one pulsar is present in the Crab Nebula (the NP 0532 - the Crab Pulsar), and found its period with a high precision: 33.09 ms. They also found that the pulsar was located in the center of the Crab Nebula, with precision of 10'.<ref name = "Comella1969"/>
 
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== 17 February ==
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Please, substitute this paragraph
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Lovelace proposed a new method of measuring magnetic fields,<ref name=TemnykhLovelace=2003>[https://patents.google.com/patent/US6639403B2/en "System and method for sensing magnetic fields based on movement"] Patent: United States Patent 6,639,403 A. Temnykh and R. V. E. Lovelace, October 28, 2003.</ref>{{Better source needed|date=January 2021}} developed a pioneering theory of intense [[ion beam]]s in pulsed diodes, which are currently used in laboratories,<ref name=SudanLovelace1973>[https://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.31.1174 "Generation of intense ion beams in pulsed diodes"]. R. N. Sudan and R. V. Lovelace 1973, ''Physical Review Letters'' 31 (19), 1174.</ref>{{Better source needed|date=January 2021}} and proposed the theory of magnetic insulation, which is used in laboratories including at [[Sandia National Laboratories]].<ref name=Lovelace1974>[https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.1694876 "Theory of magnetic insulation"] R. V. Lovelace, E. Ott 1974, ''The Physics of Fluids'' 17 (6), 1263-1268.</ref>{{Better source needed|date=January 2021}}
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with a new one (below).
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Lovelace developed a pioneering theory of intense [[ion beam]]s in pulsed diodes,<ref name=SudanLovelace1973>[https://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.31.1174 "Generation of intense ion beams in pulsed diodes"]. R. N. Sudan and R. V. Lovelace 1973, ''Physical Review Letters'' 31 (19), 1174</ref> which are currently used in laboratories,<ref name=Davidson2001>[https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=5s02DwAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PR7&ots=mwf-8814Gk&sig=7PY8ElDjWc0gMYXmnA1AizmVLLA#v=onepage&q&f=false Book: “Physics of Nonneutral Plasmas”], Ronald C. Davidson 2001, Imperial College Press and World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd (see page 2 and Ref. 22 on page 8)</ref>
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and proposed the theory of magnetic insulation,<ref name=Lovelace1974>[https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.1694876 "Theory of magnetic insulation"] R. V. Lovelace, E. Ott 1974, ''The Physics of Fluids'' 17 (6), 1263-1268.</ref> which is used in laboratories including at [[Sandia National Laboratories]].<ref name=Davidson2001a>[https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=5s02DwAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PR7&ots=mwf-8814Gk&sig=7PY8ElDjWc0gMYXmnA1AizmVLLA#v=onepage&q&f=false Book: “Physics of Nonneutral Plasmas”], Ronald C. Davidson 2001, Imperial College Press and World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd (see page 2 and Ref. 22 on page 8)</ref>
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Proposed the theory of magnetic insulation. The theory is used in laboratories, for example in Sandia National Laboratory <ref name=Lovelace1974>[https://aip.scitation.org/doi/abs/10.1063/1.1694876 “Theory of magnetic insulation''] R. V. Lovelace, E. Ott 1974, The Physics of Fluids 17 (6), 1263-1268.</ref><ref name=Davidson2001>[https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=5s02DwAAQBAJ&oi=fnd&pg=PR7&ots=mwf-8814Gk&sig=7PY8ElDjWc0gMYXmnA1AizmVLLA#v=onepage&q&f=false Book: “Physics of Nonneutral Plasmas”], Ronald C. Davidson 2001, Imperial College Press and World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd (see page 2 and Ref. 22 on page 8).
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[[User:Marina|Marina]] ([[User talk:Marina|talk]]) 03:44, 17 February 2021 (JST)
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== 11 February 2021 ==
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Please, substitute this paragraph :
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In 1968 (10 November), Lovelace and his collaborators discovered period <math>P\approx 33</math> ms of the [[Crab Pulsar]].<ref name="Lovell1973">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1973ozjb.book.....L/abstract "Out of the zenith. Jodrell Bank 1957-1970"] Sir. Bernard Lovell 1973, London: Oxford University Press, pp 1-255 (see page159).</ref> As a graduate student working at [[Arecibo Observatory]], Lovelace developed a version of the [[Fast Fourier transform]] program <ref name="Heideman1984">[https://www.cis.rit.edu/class/simg716/Gauss_History_FFT.pdf "Gauss and the history of the fast Fourier transform"] Heideman, Michael T., Johnson, Don H., Burrus, Charles Sidney 1984. (PDF). IEEE ASSP Magazine. 1 (4): 14–21.</ref> which was adapted to run on the Arecibo Observatory's [[CDC 3000 series|CDC 3200]] computer.
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<ref name="CornellDiscovery">[https://astro.cornell.edu/sites/people/files/CrabPeriodDiscovery1.pdf "On the Discovery of the Period of the Crab Nebula Pulsar"] Cornell University</ref> This program helped to separate the periodic pulsar signal from the noise, and one night he discovered the period of the [[Crab pulsar]].<ref name="Lang2013">[https://books.google.com/booksid=Nq_1CAAAQBAJ&newbks=1&newbks_redir=0&printsec=frontcover&pg=PA1&hl=en#v=onepage&q&f=false "Astrophysical formulae. space, time, matter and cosmology"] Kenneth R. Lang 2014, Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg</ref> A few weeks earlier, observers from the [[National Radio Astronomy Observatory]] reported about two pulsating sources near the Crab Nebula, with no evident periodicities.<ref name="Howard1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968IAUC.2110....2H/abstract "Pulsating radio sources near Crab Nebula"] Howard, W. E., Staelin, D. H., Reifenstein, E. C. 1968, IAU Circ., No. 2110, #2 </ref><ref name="Staelin1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968Sci...162.1481S/abstract "Pulsating radio sources near the crab nebula"] Staelin, David H. and Reifenstein, Edward C., III, December 1968, Science, Volume 162, Issue 3861, pp. 1481-1483</ref> Lovelace and collaborators found that one of pulsars (the NP 0532) is located in the center of the Crab Nebula and found it's period with a high precision: 33.09 ms.<ref name="Lang2013"/>
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: With the new one (below). In the new version, I moved "(10 November)" to later phrase, because Lovell (1973) book does not have this date (your are right!).
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:: In 1968, Lovelace and his collaborators discovered period <math>P\approx 33</math> ms of the [[Crab Pulsar]].<ref name="Lovell1973">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1973ozjb.book.....L/abstract "Out of the zenith. Jodrell Bank 1957-1970"] Sir. Bernard Lovell 1973, London: Oxford University Press, pp 1-255 (see page159)</ref> As a graduate student working at [[Arecibo Observatory]], Lovelace developed a version of the [[Fast Fourier transform]] program <ref name="Heideman1984">[https://www.cis.rit.edu/class/simg716/Gauss_History_FFT.pdf "Gauss and the history of the fast Fourier transform"] Heideman, Michael T., Johnson, Don H., Burrus, Charles Sidney 1984. (PDF). IEEE ASSP Magazine. 1 (4): 14–21.</ref> which was adapted to run on the Arecibo Observatory's [[CDC 3000 series|CDC 3200]] computer.<ref name="CornellDiscovery">[https://astro.cornell.edu/sites/people/files/CrabPeriodDiscovery1.pdf "On the Discovery of the Period of the Crab Nebula Pulsar"] Cornell University</ref> This program helped to separate the periodic pulsar signal from the noise, and one night (November 10) he discovered the period of the [[Crab pulsar]].<ref name="Lang2013">[https://books.google.com/booksid=Nq_1CAAAQBAJ&newbks=1&newbks_redir=0&printsec=frontcover&pg=PA1&hl=en#v=onepage&q&f=false "Astrophysical formulae. space, time, matter and cosmology"] Kenneth R. Lang 2014, Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg</ref> A few weeks earlier, observers from the [[National Radio Astronomy Observatory]] reported about two pulsating sources near the Crab Nebula, with no evident periodicities.<ref name="Howard1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968IAUC.2110....2H/abstract "Pulsating radio sources near Crab Nebula"] Howard, W. E., Staelin, D. H., Reifenstein, E. C. 1968, IAU Circ., No. 2110, #2 </ref><ref name="Staelin1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968Sci...162.1481S/abstract "Pulsating radio sources near the crab nebula"] Staelin, David H. and Reifenstein, Edward C., III, December 1968, Science, Volume 162, Issue 3861, pp. 1481-1483</ref> Lovelace and collaborators found that one of pulsars (the NP 0532) is located in the center of the Crab Nebula and found it's period with a high precision: 33.09 ms.<ref name="Lang2013"/>
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::: Please, substitute this paragraph:
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:::: He became a fellow of the [[American Physical Society]] in 2000, was divisional associate editor for ''[[Physical Review Letters]]'' for Plasma Physics from 1997 to 2000, in 2003 became associate editor of ''Physics of Plasmas'',<ref name=Cornell-astro/> and in 2010 became an editorial board member of ''[[Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology]]''.<ref name="CompAstroph">[https://comp-astrophys-cosmol.springeropen.com/about/editorial-board Editorial Board of the "Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology"]</ref> He was a member of the [[James Clerk Maxwell Prize for Plasma Physics]] committee of the [[American Physical Society]] in 2009-2011 and a member of the Advisory board of the [[Guggenheim Fellowship]] Foundation from 1994 to 2005.{{citation needed|date=January 2021}}
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::::: With the new one (beloow). In the new version, I removed [[ ]] brackets around [[Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology]]. Also, I removed phrases, starting from "He was a member..." to the end of the paragraph. I cannot find references, they do not keep information about former members. I propose to delete this info, because I do not like marks (citation is needed). I would like to finish this contribution without any marks of this kind. It is better to have a shorter version, but complete.
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:::::: He became a fellow of the [[American Physical Society]] in 2000, was divisional associate editor for ''[[Physical Review Letters]]'' for Plasma Physics from 1997 to 2000, in 2003 became associate editor of ''Physics of Plasmas'',<ref name=Cornell-astro/> and in 2010 became an editorial board member of ''Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology''.<ref name="CompAstroph">[https://comp-astrophys-cosmol.springeropen.com/about/editorial-board Editorial Board of the "Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology"]</ref>
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== Older modifications ==
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In 1968 (10 November), Lovelace and his collaborators discovered period <math>P\approx 33</math> ms of the [[Crab Pulsar]].<ref name="ExpertiseFinder">[https://network.expertisefinder.com/experts/richard-lovelace "Expertise Finder"] Toronto (Canada)</ref><ref name="Lovell1973">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1973ozjb.book.....L/abstract "Out of the zenith. Jodrell Bank 1957-1970"] Sir. Bernard Lovell 1973, London: Oxford University Press, pp 1-255 (see page159).</ref> As a graduate student working at [[Arecibo Observatory]], Lovelace developed a version of the [[Fast Fourier transform]] program <ref name="Heideman1984">[https://www.cis.rit.edu/class/simg716/Gauss_History_FFT.pdf "Gauss and the history of the fast Fourier transform"] Heideman, Michael T., Johnson, Don H., Burrus, Charles Sidney 1984. (PDF). IEEE ASSP Magazine. 1 (4): 14–21.</ref> which
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was adapted to run on the Arecibo Observatory's [[CDC 3000 series|CDC 3200]] computer.
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<ref name="CornellDiscovery">[https://astro.cornell.edu/sites/people/files/CrabPeriodDiscovery1.pdf "On the Discovery of the Period of the Crab Nebula Pulsar"] Cornell University</ref> This program helped to separate the periodic pulsar signal from the noise, and one night he discovered the period of the [[Crab pulsar]].<ref name="Lang2013">[https://books.google.com/booksid=Nq_1CAAAQBAJ&newbks=1&newbks_redir=0&printsec=frontcover&pg=PA1&hl=en#v=onepage&q&f=false "Astrophysical formulae. space, time, matter and cosmology"] Kenneth R. Lang 2014, Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg</ref> A few weeks earlier, observers from the [[National Radio Astronomy Observatory]] reported about two pulsating sources near the Crab Nebula, with no evident periodicities.<ref name="Howard1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968IAUC.2110....2H/abstract "Pulsating radio sources near Crab Nebula"] Howard, W. E., Staelin, D. H., Reifenstein, E. C. 1968, IAU Circ., No. 2110, #2 </ref><ref name="Staelin1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968Sci...162.1481S/abstract "Pulsating radio sources near the crab nebula"] Staelin, David H. and Reifenstein, Edward C., III, December 1968, Science, Volume 162, Issue 3861, pp. 1481-1483</ref> Lovelace and collaborators found that one of pulsars (the NP 0532) is located in the center of the Crab Nebula and found it's period with a high precision: 33.09 ms.<ref name="Lang2013"/>
 
 
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This was the fastest [[pulsar]] found at that time.<ref name="Lovell1973"/><ref>{{Cite book|last=Haensel, Paweł.|url=https://www.worldcat.org/oclc/232363234|title=Neutron stars. 1, Equation of state and structure|date=2007|publisher=Springer|others=Potekhin, A. Y., Yakovlev, D. G.|isbn=978-0-387-47301-7|location=New York|oclc=232363234}}</ref> This discovery helped to proof the idea that [[pulsars]] were rotating [[neutron stars]].<ref name="Gold1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968Natur.218..731G/abstract "Rotating neutron stars as the origin of the pulsating radio sources"] T. Gold 1968, Nature, Volume 218, Issue 5143, pp. 731-732</ref><ref name="Gold1969">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1969Natur.221...25G/abstract "Recent observations of pulsars support the rotating neutron star hypothesis."] T. Gold, 1969, Nature, Volume 221, Issue 5175, pp. 25-27.</ref> Before that, many scientists believed that pulsars were pulsating [[white dwarfs]] or [[neutron stars]].<ref name="Gold1969"/><ref name="Hewish1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968Natur.217..709H/abstract “Observations of a rapidly pulsating radio source”] A. Hewish, S. J. Bell, J. D. H. Pilkington, P. F. Scott and R. A. Collins 1968, Nature, 217, 709-713.</ref>
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Please, add reference at the end of this phrase:
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and in 2010 became an editorial board member of ''Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology''.{{Citation needed|date=January 2021}}
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and in 2010 became an editorial board member of [["Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology"]].<ref name=CompAstroph>[https://comp-astrophys-cosmol.springeropen.com/about/editorial-board Editorial Board of the "Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology"]</ref>
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: Almost submitted to wiki 9 Feb
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Dear Editor,
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Please, substitute this paragraph:
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In 1968 (10 November), Lovelace discovered period <math>P\approx 33</math> ms of the [[Crab Pulsar]].<ref name = "Comella1969" />{{Better source needed|date=January 2021}} As a graduate student working at [[Arecibo Observatory]], Lovelace developed a [[Fast Fourier transform]] program.<ref name="Lovelace1969">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1969Natur.222..231L/abstract "Digital Search Methods for Pulsars"] 1969, R. V. E. Lovelace, J. M. Sutton, E. E. Salpeter, ''Nature'' 222 (5190), 231-233.</ref>{{Better source needed|date=January 2021}} The special code named Gallop in [[Fortran]] was adapted to run on the Arecibo Observatory's [[CDC 3000 series|CDC 3200]] computer, which had a memory of 32,000 words of 24 bit length.{{Citation needed|date=January 2021}} The code was integer-based, using half-words of 12 bits, and was able to do the fast Fourier transform of N=16,384 signal samples.{{Citation needed|date=January 2021}} The 8192 signal power values were printed out on a folded raster scan.{{Citation needed|date=January 2021}} The signal to noise ratio increases as N increases.{{Citation needed|date=January 2021}} This was the largest value of N that could be handled by the Arecibo computer.{{Citation needed|date=January 2021}} This program helped to separate the periodic pulsar signal from the noise, and one night he discovered the period of the [[Crab pulsar]], which is approximately 33 ms (33.09 ms).<ref name = "Comella1969">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1969Natur.221..453C/abstract "Crab nebula pulsar NP 0532"] 1969, J. M. Comella, H. D. Craft, R. V. E. Lovelace, J. M. Sutton, G. L. Tyler, ''Nature'' 221 (5179), 453-454.</ref>{{Better source needed|date=January 2021}}
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With a new one, where I found better sources and removed numbers associated with the numerical code and computer (there are no references to these numbers, and overall - it is better without them). Instead, I added a bit of history associated with work of other people.
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In 1968 (10 November), Lovelace and his collaborators discovered period <math>P\approx 33</math> ms of the [[Crab Pulsar]].<ref name="ExpertiseFinder">[https://network.expertisefinder.com/experts/richard-lovelace "Expertise Finder"] Toronto (Canada)</ref><ref name="Lovell1973">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1973ozjb.book.....L/abstract "Out of the zenith. Jodrell Bank 1957-1970"] Sir. Bernard Lovell 1973, London: Oxford University Press, pp 1-255 (see page159).</ref> As a graduate student working at [[Arecibo Observatory]], Lovelace developed a version of the [[Fast Fourier transform]] program <ref name="Heideman1984">[https://www.cis.rit.edu/class/simg716/Gauss_History_FFT.pdf "Gauss and the history of the fast Fourier transform"] Heideman, Michael T., Johnson, Don H., Burrus, Charles Sidney 1984. (PDF). IEEE ASSP Magazine. 1 (4): 14–21.</ref> which was adapted to run on the Arecibo Observatory's [[CDC 3000 series|CDC 3200]] computer.
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<ref name="CornellDiscovery">[https://astro.cornell.edu/sites/people/files/CrabPeriodDiscovery1.pdf "On the Discovery of the Period of the Crab Nebula Pulsar"] Cornell University</ref> This program helped to separate the periodic pulsar signal from the noise, and one night he discovered the period of the [[Crab pulsar]].<ref name="Lang2013">[https://books.google.com/booksid=Nq_1CAAAQBAJ&newbks=1&newbks_redir=0&printsec=frontcover&pg=PA1&hl=en#v=onepage&q&f=false "Astrophysical formulae. space, time, matter and cosmology"] Kenneth R. Lang 2014, Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg</ref> A few weeks earlier, observers from the [[National Radio Astronomy Observatory]] reported about two pulsating sources near the Crab Nebula, with no evident periodicities.<ref name="Howard1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968IAUC.2110....2H/abstract "Pulsating radio sources near Crab Nebula"] Howard, W. E., Staelin, D. H., Reifenstein, E. C. 1968, IAU Circ., No. 2110, #2 </ref><ref name="Staelin1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968Sci...162.1481S/abstract "Pulsating radio sources near the crab nebula"] Staelin, David H. and Reifenstein, Edward C., III, December 1968, Science, Volume 162, Issue 3861, pp. 1481-1483</ref> Lovelace and collaborators found that one of pulsars (the NP 0532) is located in the center of the Crab Nebula and found it's period with a high precision: 33.09 ms.<ref name="Lang2013"/>
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: Please, substitute this paragraph:
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This was the fastest [[pulsar]] found at that time.<ref name="Lovell1973">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1973ozjb.book.....L/abstract A book:`` Out of the Zenith. Jodrell Bank 1957-1970”] Sir. Bernard Lovell, 1973, London: Oxford University Press, pp 1-255 (see page159).</ref><ref>{{Cite book|last=Haensel, Paweł.|url=https://www.worldcat.org/oclc/232363234|title=Neutron stars. 1, Equation of state and structure|date=2007|publisher=Springer|others=Potekhin, A. Y., Yakovlev, D. G.|isbn=978-0-387-47301-7|location=New York|oclc=232363234}}</ref> This discovery helped to cement the idea that [[pulsars]] were rotating [[neutron stars]].<ref name="Gold1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968Natur.218..731G/abstract ” Rotating Neutron Stars as the Origin of the Pulsating Radio Sources”] T. Gold, Nature, Volume 218, Issue 5143, pp. 731-732</ref><ref name="Gold1969">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1969Natur.221...25G/abstract `` Recent observations of pulsars support the rotating neutron star hypothesis.”] T. Gold, 1969, Nature, Volume 221, Issue 5175, pp. 25-27.</ref> Before that, many scientists believed that pulsars were pulsating [[white dwarfs]] or [[neutron stars]].<ref name="Hewish1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968Natur.217..709H/abstract “Observations of a Rapidly Pulsating Radio Source”] A. Hewish, S. J. Bell, J. D. H. Pilkington, P. F. Scott and R. A. Collins 1968, Nature, 217, 709-713.</ref><ref name="LovelaceTyler20122">[http://articles.adsabs.harvard.edu/pdf/2012Obs...132..186L "On the discovery of the period of the Crab Nebula pulsar"] 2012, R. V. E. Lovelace and G. L. Tyler, The Observatory 132, 186–187.</ref>
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With the new one below. In the old text, I do not like the phrase: "helped to cement the idea". I substituted with the phrase: "helped to proof the idea".
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This was the fastest [[pulsar]] found at that time.<ref name="Lovell1973"/><ref>{{Cite book|last=Haensel, Paweł.|url=https://www.worldcat.org/oclc/232363234|title=Neutron stars. 1, Equation of state and structure|date=2007|publisher=Springer|others=Potekhin, A. Y., Yakovlev, D. G.|isbn=978-0-387-47301-7|location=New York|oclc=232363234}}</ref> This discovery helped to proof the idea that [[pulsars]] were rotating [[neutron stars]].<ref name="Gold1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968Natur.218..731G/abstract "Rotating neutron stars as the origin of the pulsating radio sources"] T. Gold 1968, Nature, Volume 218, Issue 5143, pp. 731-732</ref><ref name="Gold1969">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1969Natur.221...25G/abstract "Recent observations of pulsars support the rotating neutron star hypothesis."] T. Gold, 1969, Nature, Volume 221, Issue 5175, pp. 25-27.</ref> Before that, many scientists believed that pulsars were pulsating [[white dwarfs]] or [[neutron stars]].<ref name="Gold1969"/><ref name="Hewish1968">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1968Natur.217..709H/abstract “Observations of a rapidly pulsating radio source”] A. Hewish, S. J. Bell, J. D. H. Pilkington, P. F. Scott and R. A. Collins 1968, Nature, 217, 709-713.</ref>
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  +
:: In addition, please substitute this phrase:
   
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and in 2010 became an editorial board member of ''Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology''.{{Citation needed|date=January 2021}}
   
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with a new one, where I added requested reference:
In 1968 (10 November), Lovelace discovered period <math>P\approx 33</math> ms of the [[Crab Pulsar]].<ref name = "Comella1969" /><ref name="Lovell1973">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1973ozjb.book.....L/abstract A book:`` Out of the Zenith. Jodrell Bank 1957-1970”] Sir. Bernard Lovell, 1973, London: Oxford University Press, pp 1-255 (see page159). As a graduate student working at [[Arecibo Observatory]], Lovelace developed a [[Fast Fourier transform]] program.<ref name="Lovelace1969">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1969Natur.222..231L/abstract "Digital Search Methods for Pulsars"] 1969, R. V. E. Lovelace, J. M. Sutton, E. E. Salpeter, ''Nature'' 222 (5190), 231-233.</ref>The special code named Gallop in [[Fortran]] was adapted to run on the Arecibo Observatory's [[CDC 3000 series|CDC 3200]] computer, which had a memory of 32,000 words of 24 bit length; the code was integer-based, using half-words of 12 bits, and was able to do the fast Fourier transform of N=16,384 signal samples; the 8192 signal power values were printed out on a folded raster scan; the signal to noise ratio increases as N increases; this was the largest value of N that could be handled by the Arecibo computer.<ref name=”LovelaceTaylor2014”>[On the Discovery of the Period of the Crab Nebula Pulsar https://astro.cornell.edu/sites/people/files/CrabPeriodDiscovery1.pdf ] R.V.E. Lovelace & G. Leonard Tyler, 2012, The Observatory, V. 132, p. 186</ref>. This program helped to separate the periodic pulsar signal from the noise, and one night he discovered the period of the [[Crab pulsar]], which is approximately 33 ms (33.09 ms).<ref name = "Comella1969">[https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1969Natur.221..453C/abstract "Crab nebula pulsar NP 0532"] 1969, J. M. Comella, H. D. Craft, R. V. E. Lovelace, J. M. Sutton, G. L. Tyler, ''Nature'' 221 (5179), 453-454.</ref><new ref=”Lang2913”>[Astrophysical Formulae
 
Space, Time, Matter and Cosmology] Kenneth R. Lang 2014, Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg</ref>
 
   
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and in 2010 became an editorial board member of [["Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology"]].<ref name=CompAstroph>[https://comp-astrophys-cosmol.springeropen.com/about/editorial-board Editorial Board of the "Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology"]</ref>
   
<ref name = "Comella1969"/>
 
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
<references/>
 
<references/>

Latest revision as of 12:49, 22 February 2021

Welcome!

Add four "tilde"s at the end; they become your signature. T (talk) 14:08, 21 December 2020 (JST) T (talk) 14:08, 21 December 2020 (JST)

I am using this space for temporary files - modifications for wiki

21 February

He invented a trapping mechanism of spin-polarized neutral gas, which has been experimentally demonstrated.[1][2]


17 February

Please, substitute this paragraph

Lovelace proposed a new method of measuring magnetic fields,[3]Template:Better source needed developed a pioneering theory of intense ion beams in pulsed diodes, which are currently used in laboratories,[4]Template:Better source needed and proposed the theory of magnetic insulation, which is used in laboratories including at Sandia National Laboratories.[5]Template:Better source needed

with a new one (below).

Lovelace developed a pioneering theory of intense ion beams in pulsed diodes,[4] which are currently used in laboratories,[6] and proposed the theory of magnetic insulation,[5] which is used in laboratories including at Sandia National Laboratories.[7]

Proposed the theory of magnetic insulation. The theory is used in laboratories, for example in Sandia National Laboratory [5]Cite error: Closing </ref> missing for <ref> tag As a graduate student working at Arecibo Observatory, Lovelace developed a version of the Fast Fourier transform program [8] which was adapted to run on the Arecibo Observatory's CDC 3200 computer. [9] This program helped to separate the periodic pulsar signal from the noise, and one night he discovered the period of the Crab pulsar.[10] A few weeks earlier, observers from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory reported about two pulsating sources near the Crab Nebula, with no evident periodicities.[11][12] Lovelace and collaborators found that one of pulsars (the NP 0532) is located in the center of the Crab Nebula and found it's period with a high precision: 33.09 ms.[10]

With the new one (below). In the new version, I moved "(10 November)" to later phrase, because Lovell (1973) book does not have this date (your are right!).
In 1968, Lovelace and his collaborators discovered period \(P\approx 33\) ms of the Crab Pulsar.[13] As a graduate student working at Arecibo Observatory, Lovelace developed a version of the Fast Fourier transform program [8] which was adapted to run on the Arecibo Observatory's CDC 3200 computer.[9] This program helped to separate the periodic pulsar signal from the noise, and one night (November 10) he discovered the period of the Crab pulsar.[10] A few weeks earlier, observers from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory reported about two pulsating sources near the Crab Nebula, with no evident periodicities.[11][12] Lovelace and collaborators found that one of pulsars (the NP 0532) is located in the center of the Crab Nebula and found it's period with a high precision: 33.09 ms.[10]
Please, substitute this paragraph:
He became a fellow of the American Physical Society in 2000, was divisional associate editor for Physical Review Letters for Plasma Physics from 1997 to 2000, in 2003 became associate editor of Physics of Plasmas,[14] and in 2010 became an editorial board member of Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology.[15] He was a member of the James Clerk Maxwell Prize for Plasma Physics committee of the American Physical Society in 2009-2011 and a member of the Advisory board of the Guggenheim Fellowship Foundation from 1994 to 2005.Template:Citation needed


With the new one (beloow). In the new version, I removed [[ ]] brackets around Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology. Also, I removed phrases, starting from "He was a member..." to the end of the paragraph. I cannot find references, they do not keep information about former members. I propose to delete this info, because I do not like marks (citation is needed). I would like to finish this contribution without any marks of this kind. It is better to have a shorter version, but complete.
He became a fellow of the American Physical Society in 2000, was divisional associate editor for Physical Review Letters for Plasma Physics from 1997 to 2000, in 2003 became associate editor of Physics of Plasmas,[14] and in 2010 became an editorial board member of Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology.[15]

Older modifications

In 1968 (10 November), Lovelace and his collaborators discovered period \(P\approx 33\) ms of the Crab Pulsar.[16][13] As a graduate student working at Arecibo Observatory, Lovelace developed a version of the Fast Fourier transform program [8] which was adapted to run on the Arecibo Observatory's CDC 3200 computer. [9] This program helped to separate the periodic pulsar signal from the noise, and one night he discovered the period of the Crab pulsar.[10] A few weeks earlier, observers from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory reported about two pulsating sources near the Crab Nebula, with no evident periodicities.[11][12] Lovelace and collaborators found that one of pulsars (the NP 0532) is located in the center of the Crab Nebula and found it's period with a high precision: 33.09 ms.[10]

This was the fastest pulsar found at that time.[13][17] This discovery helped to proof the idea that pulsars were rotating neutron stars.[18][19] Before that, many scientists believed that pulsars were pulsating white dwarfs or neutron stars.[19][20]

Please, add reference at the end of this phrase:

and in 2010 became an editorial board member of Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology.Template:Citation needed

and in 2010 became an editorial board member of "Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology".[15]

Almost submitted to wiki 9 Feb

Dear Editor,

Please, substitute this paragraph:

In 1968 (10 November), Lovelace discovered period \(P\approx 33\) ms of the Crab Pulsar.[21]Template:Better source needed As a graduate student working at Arecibo Observatory, Lovelace developed a Fast Fourier transform program.[22]Template:Better source needed The special code named Gallop in Fortran was adapted to run on the Arecibo Observatory's CDC 3200 computer, which had a memory of 32,000 words of 24 bit length.Template:Citation needed The code was integer-based, using half-words of 12 bits, and was able to do the fast Fourier transform of N=16,384 signal samples.Template:Citation needed The 8192 signal power values were printed out on a folded raster scan.Template:Citation needed The signal to noise ratio increases as N increases.Template:Citation needed This was the largest value of N that could be handled by the Arecibo computer.Template:Citation needed This program helped to separate the periodic pulsar signal from the noise, and one night he discovered the period of the Crab pulsar, which is approximately 33 ms (33.09 ms).[21]Template:Better source needed

With a new one, where I found better sources and removed numbers associated with the numerical code and computer (there are no references to these numbers, and overall - it is better without them). Instead, I added a bit of history associated with work of other people.

In 1968 (10 November), Lovelace and his collaborators discovered period \(P\approx 33\) ms of the Crab Pulsar.[16][13] As a graduate student working at Arecibo Observatory, Lovelace developed a version of the Fast Fourier transform program [8] which was adapted to run on the Arecibo Observatory's CDC 3200 computer. [9] This program helped to separate the periodic pulsar signal from the noise, and one night he discovered the period of the Crab pulsar.[10] A few weeks earlier, observers from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory reported about two pulsating sources near the Crab Nebula, with no evident periodicities.[11][12] Lovelace and collaborators found that one of pulsars (the NP 0532) is located in the center of the Crab Nebula and found it's period with a high precision: 33.09 ms.[10]

Please, substitute this paragraph:

This was the fastest pulsar found at that time.[13][23] This discovery helped to cement the idea that pulsars were rotating neutron stars.[18][19] Before that, many scientists believed that pulsars were pulsating white dwarfs or neutron stars.[20][24]

With the new one below. In the old text, I do not like the phrase: "helped to cement the idea". I substituted with the phrase: "helped to proof the idea".

This was the fastest pulsar found at that time.[13][25] This discovery helped to proof the idea that pulsars were rotating neutron stars.[18][19] Before that, many scientists believed that pulsars were pulsating white dwarfs or neutron stars.[19][20]

In addition, please substitute this phrase:

and in 2010 became an editorial board member of Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology.Template:Citation needed

with a new one, where I added requested reference:

and in 2010 became an editorial board member of "Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology".[15]

References

  1. "Magnetic confinement of a neutral gas" R. V. E. Lovelace, C. Mehanian, T. J. Tommila, D. M. Lee 1985, Nature 318 (6041), 30-36.
  2. “Nobel lecture: When atoms behave as waves: Bose-Einstein condensation and the atom laser” W. Ketterle 2002, Reviews of Modern Physics, 74, 1131-1151 (see page 1134)
  3. "System and method for sensing magnetic fields based on movement" Patent: United States Patent 6,639,403 A. Temnykh and R. V. E. Lovelace, October 28, 2003.
  4. 4.0 4.1 "Generation of intense ion beams in pulsed diodes". R. N. Sudan and R. V. Lovelace 1973, Physical Review Letters 31 (19), 1174. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "SudanLovelace1973" defined multiple times with different content
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 "Theory of magnetic insulation" R. V. Lovelace, E. Ott 1974, The Physics of Fluids 17 (6), 1263-1268. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Lovelace1974" defined multiple times with different content
  6. Book: “Physics of Nonneutral Plasmas”, Ronald C. Davidson 2001, Imperial College Press and World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd (see page 2 and Ref. 22 on page 8)
  7. Book: “Physics of Nonneutral Plasmas”, Ronald C. Davidson 2001, Imperial College Press and World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd (see page 2 and Ref. 22 on page 8)
  8. 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 "Gauss and the history of the fast Fourier transform" Heideman, Michael T., Johnson, Don H., Burrus, Charles Sidney 1984. (PDF). IEEE ASSP Magazine. 1 (4): 14–21.
  9. 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 "On the Discovery of the Period of the Crab Nebula Pulsar" Cornell University
  10. 10.0 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 10.5 10.6 10.7 "Astrophysical formulae. space, time, matter and cosmology" Kenneth R. Lang 2014, Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg
  11. 11.0 11.1 11.2 11.3 "Pulsating radio sources near Crab Nebula" Howard, W. E., Staelin, D. H., Reifenstein, E. C. 1968, IAU Circ., No. 2110, #2
  12. 12.0 12.1 12.2 12.3 "Pulsating radio sources near the crab nebula" Staelin, David H. and Reifenstein, Edward C., III, December 1968, Science, Volume 162, Issue 3861, pp. 1481-1483
  13. 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 13.5 "Out of the zenith. Jodrell Bank 1957-1970" Sir. Bernard Lovell 1973, London: Oxford University Press, pp 1-255 (see page159) Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Lovell1973" defined multiple times with different content Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Lovell1973" defined multiple times with different content Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Lovell1973" defined multiple times with different content
  14. 14.0 14.1 Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named Cornell-astro
  15. 15.0 15.1 15.2 15.3 Editorial Board of the "Journal of Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology"
  16. 16.0 16.1 "Expertise Finder" Toronto (Canada)
  17. Template:Cite book
  18. 18.0 18.1 18.2 "Rotating neutron stars as the origin of the pulsating radio sources" T. Gold 1968, Nature, Volume 218, Issue 5143, pp. 731-732 Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Gold1968" defined multiple times with different content Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Gold1968" defined multiple times with different content
  19. 19.0 19.1 19.2 19.3 19.4 "Recent observations of pulsars support the rotating neutron star hypothesis." T. Gold, 1969, Nature, Volume 221, Issue 5175, pp. 25-27. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Gold1969" defined multiple times with different content Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Gold1969" defined multiple times with different content
  20. 20.0 20.1 20.2 “Observations of a rapidly pulsating radio source” A. Hewish, S. J. Bell, J. D. H. Pilkington, P. F. Scott and R. A. Collins 1968, Nature, 217, 709-713. Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Hewish1968" defined multiple times with different content Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; name "Hewish1968" defined multiple times with different content
  21. 21.0 21.1 "Crab nebula pulsar NP 0532" 1969, J. M. Comella, H. D. Craft, R. V. E. Lovelace, J. M. Sutton, G. L. Tyler, Nature 221 (5179), 453-454.
  22. "Digital Search Methods for Pulsars" 1969, R. V. E. Lovelace, J. M. Sutton, E. E. Salpeter, Nature 222 (5190), 231-233.
  23. Template:Cite book
  24. "On the discovery of the period of the Crab Nebula pulsar" 2012, R. V. E. Lovelace and G. L. Tyler, The Observatory 132, 186–187.
  25. Template:Cite book